Category: Society

Parental Involvement: Impact on a Child’s Education

Providing for a family is a challenging task in today’s world. Parents work long hours to pay bills and ensure that their children live a comfortable life. As a result, most parents return home tired and with little energy or time to follow up on their children’s educational progress. Some parents delegate all educational responsibilities to teachers. However, a child whose parents are supportive and involved in his or her education has a better chance of succeeding in school.

Firstly, children whose parents play a critical role in their education score higher grades than those whose parents play a passive role or are absent altogether. This is because active parents encourage their children to succeed in school. They aid their children to do their homework and help teachers to identify and solve difficulties encountered in their children’s education. They also help their children choose subjects and courses they can pursue with passion and excellence. The involvement of parents in the education of their child also influences teachers (Jeynes, 2011). Since instructors play a significant role in rating and grading a child, “a high degree of parental involvement likely influences how the teacher perceives and even grades the child” (Jeynes, 2011, p. 55). According to Chance (1997), providing teachers with feedback about a child’s attitude and well being can help the child achieve higher scores in IQ tests and vocabulary competence.

Secondly, children with supportive parents are more disciplined than those with unsupported parents.  It is easy for parents who follow up on their children’s school activities to identify weaknesses that may lead to indiscipline. They can then discuss such weaknesses with teachers and develop strategies and mechanisms to rectify the weaknesses. As a result, children with such parents are less likely to develop disorderly behaviors. Children with supportive parents are less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol or to be suspended from school (Feuerstein, 2000). A study by Sui-Chu and Willms (1996) concluded that eighth graders whose parents were keen on their child’s schoolwork had reduced absenteeism and were less likely to drop out of school. Schools with many activities that require parental involvement report fewer incidences of violent or antisocial behavior (Connor, 2012).

Thirdly, the involvement of a parent in a child’s education increases the child’s self-esteem. A high self-esteem, in turn, improves the child’s general well being and their success in education (Feuerstein, 2000). Amsel (2013), who holds a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in sociology, wrote that limited parental involvement makes children feel unappreciated because there is no one to remind them that they are admirable, valuable and exciting. Children who feel unappreciated have negative thoughts and feelings about themselves (Amsel, 2013). This hampers the development of the children’s self-confidence and compromises their self-esteem (Amsel, 2013). Parents who want to improve their child’s esteem should not restrict their involvement to activities at school. Rather, “parental involvement in the education of children encompasses education-related activities both at home and school” (Onwughalu, 2011, p. 5). However, Amsel (2013) also warned parents that overindulgence in their child’s life may give the child little room to self-reflect and develop self-esteem.

In conclusion, involvement of parents in their children’s education improves the children’s chances of succeeding in school. Children with caring and involved parents score higher grades in school. This is evident from various studies that show students with supportive parents scoring high marks in tests. Such children have an elevated level of discipline and are less likely to engage in antisocial activities. Finally, the esteem of a child is dependent on his or her parent’s involvement in his or her life and education. This, in turn, affects the child’s performance in school. Thus, parents should strive to find time to follow up on their children’s education and collaborate with teachers to support and encourage their children.

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‘Prachu’ Ki Wedding ! :D (Part 2)

In every culture around the world wedding has a very special place as it revolves around the life of a couple about to tie the knot and the people closely related to them. To our understanding and experience Indian wedding is a very special one that not only bridges the two families and their cultures; but also creates a lifelong commitment. The best part is that it ushers to the culmination of a ceremony inculcating joy and woes.

People unaware of Indian wedding rituals and cultures may raise a question here. We therefore take this opportunity to make a brief study here.The bride and the groom are ethnically dressed in abundance of flowers, jeweleries and makeups. Relatives of both bride and groom throng at the venue of the wedding solemnization to witness the event. The USP (Unique Selling Proposition) of Indian wedding is that the ceremony begins a few days ahead of the date of solemnization and ends after a few days from the date of the solemnization event.

The bride and the groom are blessed with ornaments, finest clothing and others. The most unusual part of an Indian wedding is that the bride passes through a transition that simultaneously brings tears and joy to her and it is visible in her eyes! Fear of losing the parent’s proximity and moving to the groom’s home (a completely new place) bring tears to her eyes. At the same time the opportunity of meeting with her beau brings happiness to her. Bride’s parents also pass through this phase of irony that brings tears and happiness to them.

For me, it represents emotions. Great emotions. Emotions of two families coming together. Emotions of two lives coming together. Emotions of a bride, leaving behind a life to start a beautiful journey.She laughs. She sings. She dances.For a second, let us leave behind all the extravaganzas and all the ‘over the top’ preparations behind and just focus on her smile. She radiates beauty, a colorful beauty that only an Indian bride can display.

 People around her watch her in awe. They say a woman is her most beautiful when she looks upon her child. I would say an Indian bride in her traditional outfit comes really close to that.She is the embodiment of a dream. A dream her parents shared. A dream every Indian has. The dream of seeing their daughter happily married. It’s probably even more important than seeing their sons successful.

The wedding, known as ‘Vivaah’ in Hindi, is in itself a celebration of grandeur. The concept of divorce is still alien in the Indian culture, and was quite rare a few decades ago. You were destined to marry once and that was it. Hence, the grand celebration. There’s an old saying we Indians have regarding this. There are only three days in a person’s life. The day she is born, the day she gets married, and the day she dies.

Traditional marriage celebrations last for as long as a week. There are all sorts of traditions that have to be followed. And although the groom is, theoretically, an equal partner in the wedding celebration, yet the attention is always centered at the bride. The beautiful bride.

Family, they say, is like a tree which never goes out of shade for you. Sailing through together in every storm, the family will never dodge your side. The relation with a mother never needed an introduction. Remember how she smiles even when you appreciate her cooking your favorite dish? With you owing most of your jumps on success ladder to her, she still gratifies your first cradling step in her heart. With memories of early morning coffee during your exams to blessings for your every small success, it is impeccable how this relation never fails to earn respect.

A father in any family is the reason one’s being, the walls of your bastion were made stronger by his sweat and blood for you. The sleepless nights of hard work and dedication were to ensure you the future you live in. From the first cricket match where he let you win to the strict coaching over the lessons of life, he being by your side gave you the confidence to embark on the journey you always wanted. Having siblings in the house is always a blessing. Those wild dreams and that notorious side of yours, could only be executed with them.  They know that sometimes only a mischief would bring a smile on your face.They stood by you when you gave up on your caliber, they slipped few extra money to you that made a lot of difference, they were there giving you tips on your first interview.The smile you hold today has his contribution too.

The celebrations are just an excuse to remind how important is the presence of family in one’s life. With they being by your edge, there is nothing in this world you can’t achieve.Marriages are true examples of a family bonding,love and commitment.It can only be seen in Indian weddings.

More to come in next post.I am the most  fickle-minded person on this planet.To know why, Wait until next post come.Happy Reading!

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Shri Yantra :- “All you need to know about this sacred geometry”

Yantra or amulet is a geometrical diagram, which represents the entire universe. Yantras are used for meditation and worshipping of deity. Yantra can be a two or three dimensional object. In Hinduism there are mainly 6 types of Yantras and each Yantra has inscribed seed mantra and hence they are considered as powerful as verbal mantras.

The Yantra is made of metal or stone, for Shri Yantra it is said that it gives more effect, when embossed on the bark tree leaf. It is then purified at the sacred place. Then it is used for worshipping. It is treated as a visual impression of the unseen deity.

The famous Shri Yantra, which is of goddess Lakshmi has nine intersecting isosceles triangles of various sizes. There are four upward triangles, which represents the power of Lord Shiva, the male power and five downward triangles which represent female power “Shakti” . This Yantra has basically 9 segments which are:

1) One dot: It is like a central power point from which the entire universe and the cosmos is evolved.

2) Triangle: The three angles of  a triangle represents Poornagiri, Kamroopa and Jalandhar Peetha.

3) Eight goddesses and Vasukona: Eight goddess control eight traits Vashini controls heat, Mohini controls misery, Jamini controls Sattva, Vimla controls desire, Kameshwari controls comfort, Deviye controls cold, Kaulini controls Tamas and Sarveshwari Devi controls Ragas.

4) Ten Triangles: Ten triangles also represent ten goddesses

5) Ten Triangles: Each triangle represents a deity or God or Sarvagya.

6) One circle: This circle has 14 triangles, and these triangles represent 14 blood vessels of the human body.

7) Eight Lotus Petals: Each petal represents eight intellects

8) Sixteen Petals: Sixteen petals in a circle represent intellect, sound, touch, heart, memory, perseverance, fame, subtle body and ethereal body.

9) A circle: With the help of this circle, other triangles take their shapes.

So, in total there are 43 triangles in Shri Yantra, which again forms 108 triangles. All centrally located upward triangles are dominated by Lord Shiva, and downward triangles are dominated by goddess Lakshmi or Shakti.

Shri Yantra is a very famous and most fruitful Yantra, among all 272 types of Yantra. According to ‘Yamal’ treatise  if a person only looks at the Yantra everyday, then he may attain many benefits.

According to the treaty, bathing countless times can not be that much more effective, but looking at the Yantra can be very much effective and can give the best result to the aspirant.Shri Yantra, which is a goddess Lakshmi Yantra, is a mean to gain wealth. If the Yantra is worshipped properly, as per the written procedures in trinities, then the aspirant can gain immense  treasure, luxuries, wealth and fame. Having this Yantra at home and worshipping it daily can give best result and everyone must have two Shri Yantras. One for home and one for work place. All worldly desires can be fulfilled by
worshipping it.

India And Cricket

My Dear Cricket,

I am so excited to finally write to you. My hands seem to be shivering. Do you have any idea about how big you are in our country? You are compared to religion here. And everybody knows religion is India’s fuel – without it our news anchors would have nothing to talk about.

I became a fan of you when I was a kid. Well, what is a fan exactly? When I was four, I watched you on TV with my dad because whenever there was a match on, he used to sit in front of the TV and not leave it till the DD National jingle came on after the last bowl was bowled. I remember watching matches on Sunday morning. The only reason I got up was because my mom would fry pakodas and leave them in front of my father while he watched the game.

Love for you exists in the whole of our family. My uncle loves to comment about how much a batsman would make, but quickly shushes someone else up if they say anything. My mom is a bad omen. Whenever she enters the room and says something negative about India, a wicket falls. My sister often pushes her out of the room.

I remember the World Cups. There used to be preparation a week in advance. Everyone would make predictions. I peeked into the drawing room, my father talking to his friends fiercely debating about Kapil Dev’s history and Sourav Ganguly’s present. I only had eyes for one – the New Zealand captain. I did not much know the game in the beginning, but he looked incredibly handsome to me (I couldn’t even pronounce his name properly). I stood in front of my mirror and practised what I would say to him when I grew up, finished school and flew to New Zealand.

The fever for gully cricket overtook me, too.Somehow, I liked fielding as much as everyone else in the ground hated it. I liked standing near the boundary (marked by slippers of the players) and viewing the game in all of its glory. The bowler would run up, twist his hand in a way that I haven’t been able to understand yet (I never could bowl – still can’t) and the ball would fly to the other end of the ground. There would be a lovely sound (this is still my favourite part of gully cricket and my one complaint with cricket on TV) – thwack! – and the ball would fly, as gracefully as a ballerina in a pink tutu.

Winter mornings were especially hard. I remember hurting my hands catching the red ‘rubber wali’ ball. It was heavy and hurt like hell, but I was unwilling to concede to the boys who had accepted me as one of their own. They even let me bat. I was decent at it. I remember I once scored 32 runs, and it was one of the happiest mornings of my life. Until the dirty ball landed in the bucket which contained white school shirts washed with Surf Excel. I gingerly took out the ball, stuffed the shirt on top towards the bottom, and my mother never found out what I had done. When the craze for Harbhajan Singh was at its height, I tied my hair up like Sikh people and asked my mom to take me to meet him. She was surprised. She just laughed, and I was left puzzled.

I miss you, though. Stupid thing to say, right? How can I miss you when you are still here? But have you never felt it? Missing someone even when they are around? Wishing things would be the same as they were? Nostalgia has set in. I am sorry, cricket, but you have changed. I was never one for tests (I would sleep off in my father’s lap, ketchup from the pakodas still on my lips), but I enjoyed ODIs immensely. When you started T20s, I felt a little betrayed, but I watched them in the beginning. It was fun, definitely. To see the sixes swishing and the fours gliding. But as soon as the novelty wore off, I felt betrayed. It was nothing compared to what I felt when the IPL started. I felt as if someone was intentionally tarnishing my childhood memories. I still refuse to watch the IPL or read news about it.

But, as they say, once you love, you never really leave. When I am in college,I don’t watch you enough. Score updates through a phone application have taken the place of sitting through the match, watching even the ‘Fourth Umpire’ on DD National. But I still love you. You are a part of my childhood that I have carried into my twenties, and I am glad you’re still here. But when I see kids play in the lane beneath my balcony, that old yearning to field comes back to me, and in that moment I’m my little, happy, careless self again.You were and will be am important part of our country’s pride and memories.

With love and warm wishes,

-An Indian Kid